Posted tagged ‘Brooklyn Museum’

Wikipedia Loves Art…we have a winner!

April 6, 2009

The Stanley Theater - Jersey City

We chose Robert Smyth’s photograph of the Stanley Theater in Jersey City as our Wikipedia Loves Art Winner! We thought Robert did a great job of capturing old movie house architecture, and his photo would be ideal for illustrating a Wikipedia article. He’s won a subscription to Film Comment magazine, as well as a five-series movie pass to one of our series at The Film Society.

Wikipedia Loves Art was a month-long scavenger hunt organized by the Brooklyn Museum and involving a diverse group of institutions such as the Indianapolis Museum of ArtLos Angeles County Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, V&A, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Carnegie Museum of Art, The Film Society of Lincoln Center, Honolulu Academy of Arts, Houston Museum of Natural Science, The Hunter Museum of American Art, The Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, New-York Historical Society, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Taft Museum of Art.

You can see all the great photographs taken of historic movie theaters here. A big thanks to all of the participants–it was a tough decision!

Advertisements

SXSW Interactive Part 2: Thanks to technology, you can take it with you

March 18, 2009

One of the most interesting discoveries I made while at South by Southwest Interactive was all of the exciting stuff people are doing with Advanced Programming Interfaces, or APIs. Did I lose you at “advanced” or “interface” and you want to go back to reading about Terminator? Don’t worry if you have no idea what an API is–I didn’t either, until I did a little poking around the Internet. Shelly Bernstein of the Brooklyn Museum wrote a very helpful explanation for all us non-programmers. Simply put, organizations can use APIs to open up their vast libraries of information (the New York Times archives, the collections at the Brookyn Museum) so that outside developers can develop new ways for users to access that information.

The next time you get something useful from Twitter, a Facebook ap or your iPhone, thank a movement that is goosing large, information-rich organizations to get more of their information out there via APIs. A badge on your blog that serves up relevant content from your favorite publication, or a mini-gallery straight to your iPhone are two ways that the collaboration fostered by APIs can manifest.

It turns out that “social networking” is more than just updating your Facebook status. And as organizations begin to open a two-way conversation with the public via social media, we would be remiss in failing to recognize the opportunities in the kind of information sharing that can grow out of APIs.  This is a different type of social/online interaction–inviting in talented collaborators from the tech world to help us do a better job of getting vital information into new spaces–but as mobile devices begin taking over the world, an increasingly vital one.

And while the Film Society of Lincoln Center isn’t equipped yet to offer our visitors creative and/or mobile access our deep reservoir of knowledge on classic films and festival selections from the New York Film Festival and New Directors/New Films, it isn’t hard to imagine a future in which we will be able to index exactly that sort of content, and serve as a resource for students studying film, offer movie-lovers  a mobile gateway into a deeper understanding of what they’ve just seen, or to simply help someone select a new discovery from our diverse offerings.

Wikipedia’s Jimmy Wales talks about Wikipedia Loves Art

February 7, 2009

The Wikipedia Loves Art pool now has over three hundred items. And tonight you can join other participants for Brooklyn Museum’s free First Saturday event.

And don’t forget–the Film Society of Lincoln Center wants your shots of historic movie house architecture. You can win great prizes, including movie passes and a subscription to Film Comment magazine.

Take pictures. Love art. Win prizes. Make history. Have a blast. This Feburary, Wikipedia loves art!

January 26, 2009

Wikipedia Loves Art
Art-lovers, start your engines. Wikipedia Loves Art is almost here. This month-long scavenger hunt organized by the Brooklyn Museum and involving a diverse group of institutions will have you snapping away in the vaulted halls of such far-flung institutions as the Indianapolis Museum of ArtLos Angeles County Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, V&A, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Carnegie Museum of Art, The Film Society of Lincoln Center, Honolulu Academy of Arts, Houston Museum of Natural Science, The Hunter Museum of American Art, The Jewish Museum, Museum of Modern Art, New-York Historical Society, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Taft Museum of Art.

What’s this all about? you’re wondering. It’s an ambitious effort to gather together the efforts of groups of photographers to illustrate Wikipedia articles. It’s also a chance be a part of a unique effort, get to explore great historic and artistic collections, to win prizes, and to have a lot of fun along the way.

So what’ll it be, shutterbugs?

  • Egyptian sarcophagi at the Metropolitan Museum of Art?
  • A bark painting at the Art Gallery of New South Wales?
  • A John Singer Sargent portrait at The New York Historical Society?

With participating institutions all over the world, there are a million ways to get involved.

Here’s how to get started:

1. Check out the Wikipedia Loves Art Flickr group. Decide which institution you’d like to shoot for, and check out the rules and scavenger hunt lists they post–those will determine what you’ll be shooting, and what you can win.

2. You can shoot as part of a team or as an individual, but be sure to sign up to participate.

3. Stay tuned to find out about events during the month of February. One of the first is at Brooklyn Museum’s First Saturday on February 7th, and it’s free.

PLEASE NOTE: Our own contribution to the contest invites photographs from all over the country to capture shots that celebrate the history of film exhibition, and would be good illustrations for Wikipedia articles about the history of film. So you need not be on a team or be in a city to win a prize from the Film Society of Lincoln Center. So please submit shots of iconic movie houses, surviving movie palaces, drive-in theaters, crumbling remnants, projection equipment and other aspects of movie house architecture.

For full rules and directions, see the Flickr group.

[Brooklyn Museum: Wikipedia Loves Art Full House]

[filmlinc blog: From the Department of Awesome Social Media Ideas]

Where were you yesterday?

January 21, 2009

IMG_2715

Above, the staff of Lincoln Center watching the presidential inauguration in the Kaplan Penthouse. One of our photographs was featured on the official Flickr blog!

Remember that you are welcome to join and contribute photos to the Film Society of Lincoln Center Flickr pool.

Avid photographer? Please make sure to join us for Wikipedia Loves Art, along with contest coordinator Brooklyn Museum, plus participants Art Gallery of New South Wales, Carnegie Museum of Art, Houston Museum of Natural Science, Indianapolis Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and V&A. It’s a free content contest and scavenger hunt taking place in February that promises to be lots of fun!

[Wikipedia: Wikipedia Loves Art]

[Flickr blog: We Watched]

From the department of awesome social media ideas: Wikipedia Loves Art!

January 12, 2009

2575117122_7a96f6ca18

Photo via Flickr by Vannah

Art-lovers, Wikipedia obsessives, and shutterbugs, rejoice! In February, you’ll have the chance to be a part of an extraordinary effort to capture museum collections the world over to better illustrate Wikipedia articles. Wikipedia Loves Art is a scavenger hunt and free content photography contest coordinated with the Brooklyn Museum, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the V&A and now The Film Society of Lincoln Center. While yes, it’s true that we don’t have any art on our walls, we’re thrilled to be taking part in this project spearheaded by the Brooklyn Museum.

Check out the rules of the overall contest here. There are lots of ways to get involved. You can go scavenging with a team at one of the museums listed above, or you can work on a Wikipedia entry that needs some help. To play for a Film Society of Lincoln Center prize, submit photographs of historic movie house architecture–i.e., iconic movie houses, surviving movie palaces, drive-ins, crumbling remnants, projection equipment and other aspects of movie house architecture. These can be nationwide–at the Ziegfeld, or at an Egyptian theater in LA, or perhaps you could visit Bud Cadell’s favorite, the Alamo Drafthouse in Austin, TX. It’s all about celebrating classic movie houses, and coming up with great images for Wikipedia. An in-house panel will pick a winner who will receive a five-film series pass and a subscription to Film Comment magazine.

The event is planned to run for the whole month of February 2009, so get your cameras ready and stay tuned for more details on activities related to the project.